Common Painkillers Linked to Heart Attack Risk

Common Painkillers Linked to Heart Attack Risk

The British Medical Journal recently published a large study showing a link between taking common painkillers and an increased risk of heart attack. Familiar over-the-counter medications used in this study include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve). Both of these raised the likelihood of experiencing a heart attack anywhere from 20 to 50 percent compared
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Take a Load Off of Your Knees

Take a Load Off of Your Knees

A brand new study finds that shedding those extra pounds can take a load off of the knees.1 Excess weight puts a strain on the knees that can result in osteoarthritis and possibly the need for joint replacement. However, the research shows people who lost five percent or more of their weight over a four-year
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Active Commuting Linked to Numerous Health Benefits

Active Commuting Linked to Numerous Health Benefits

A large study recently published in the British Medical Journal finds that active commuting, particularly biking and walking, is associated with multiple health benefits. Results show people who cycle to work have a 46 percent lower risk of heart disease and a 45 percent lower risk of cancer compared to those who have a sedentary
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Smoking Has Long-Lasting Effects on DNA

Smoking Has Long-Lasting Effects on DNA

A new study finds that smoking cigarettes can leave a lasting imprint on DNA. This bad habit can alter more than 7,000 genes, which in turn can contribute to the development of smoking-related diseases, such as cancer, COPD, heart disease, and more. Cigarette smoking remains the leading preventable cause of death worldwide, accounting for nearly
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Exercise Training + Patient Education for Neck Pain

Exercise Training + Patient Education for Neck Pain

Exercise training and patient education are both common approaches for helping people with neck pain. Multiple studies have emerged to help find the most cost-effective path for patients. This often involves breaking common treatment ideas into their components and seeing if we can get the same results with less investment. A recent, randomized-controlled trial takes
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