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Improve Parkinson’s Symptoms with More Physical Activity

Improve Parkinson’s Symptoms with More Physical Activity

A new study from the University of Michigan shows that everyday physical activity is linked with less severe motor symptoms in Parkinson’s patients.1 The good news is the activity doesn’t have to include vigorous exercise. Taking your dog for a walk, working in the garden, or going grocery shopping are great examples of ways to
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Eating Whole Grains Linked With Lower Risk of Death

Eating Whole Grains Linked With Lower Risk of Death

A large meta-analysis published in the American Heart Association’s journal, Circulation, finds that eating whole grains is associated with a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all causes. Consuming at least three servings (48 grams) per day reduces the total number of deaths by 20 percent. Heart disease and cancer death rates
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Nerve Damage in the Neck? Physical Therapy Can Help!

Nerve Damage in the Neck? Physical Therapy Can Help!

Cervical radiculopathy, often occurring as a result of an opening between two vertebrae, is a disorder where nerves are damaged in the neck. In addition to the neck, pain and other symptoms can arise in the shoulders, arms, or hands. The good news is a recent randomized, controlled trial shows that physical therapy provides clinically
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Many Take Painkillers for Months After Knee and Hip Replacements

Many Take Painkillers for Months After Knee and Hip Replacements

A recent study finds many knee and hip replacements patients continue to take powerful prescription painkillers months after their surgery. The findings are a concern because of the rising rates of opioid addiction and overdoses in the United States.   Study authors analyzed data from 574 knee or hip replacement patients. Taking the painkillers before
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Tennis and Other Racket Sports Linked to Longer Life

Tennis and Other Racket Sports Linked to Longer Life

A recent study shows that people who play racket sports, such as tennis, badminton, and squash, live longer than their non-playing counterparts. The study examined physical activity data from more than 80,000 participants with average age of 52. The participants were divided into groups based on the sport(s) that they engaged in (cycling, swimming, racket
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